Mental Health Services

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CaroMont Center for Mental Wellness provides comprehensive inpatient care for adults needing psychiatric treatment.  This care includes 24-hour assessment services in the emergency department and age-specific programs in the inpatient setting. Our compassionate, experienced interdisciplinary team strives to provide exceptional care and to treat every patient as an individual. We seek to treat the “whole” person and to work closely as a team to tailor your treatment to meet your mental wellness goals. We believe individuals can create change in their lives that will assist them to attain and maintain optimal mental wellness. Our goal is that you will have a rewarding experience with us.

Services:

Mental Disorder Services:
The majority of mental disorders are thought to be caused by complex factors. Chemical imbalances within the brain, dysfunctional coping patterns, and environmental factors can all play a part in triggering mental disorder symptoms.  With proper treatment and hard work, most people with mental disorders can lead healthy, productive, and fulfilling lives.

CaroMont Health’s Center for Mental Wellness provides comprehensive treatment to patients dealing with a mental health disorder that is interfering with their quality of life. The psychiatric unit is a therapeutic community where you can work with the staff to address the problems that led to your admission. During your stay you will be assigned to an interdisciplinary treatment team with the objective of providing for your individualized plan of care. This team is made up of many disciplines including your Psychiatrist, a Registered Nurse, a Clinical Social Worker, an Activity Therapist and an Addictions Counselor. Some of the services provided by your treatment team include Psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Individual therapy and Group therapy. Common topics that are covered in therapy include Coping Skills, Anger Management, Peer Pressure, Stress Management and Medication Management.

Dual Diagnosis and Substance Abuse Services:
Our dual Diagnosis program educates the patient on the elements of addictive diseases, mental disorders, and their interactions and effects. Addiction to drugs and/or alcohol can drastically alter one’s quality of life, limiting their ability to care for themselves and significantly impacting their recovery from a mental disorder.  Our Substance Abuse services offer treatment and support to patients with a history of drug or alcohol abuse. Services include initial evaluation and ongoing assessments, 24-hour assessment services, individual and group counseling, family therapy, substance abuse education and more. Every day, we strive to help our patients believe in themselves, regain control and reach recovery.

Mental Disorders that effect Adults and Children

Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is one of the most complex of all mental health disorders. It is a severe, chronic, and disabling disturbance of the brain that causes distorted thinking, strange feelings, unusual behavior and use of language and words. Positive symptoms of Schizophrenia include hallucinations (seeing, hearing, seeing or feeling things that others do not) and delusions (false beliefs that may not change even when proof is that they are not true or logical). It is estimated that about one percent of Americans have this illness.

Psychosis
Psychosis can occur as a symptom of any severe form of mental disorder in which there is a
 loss of touch with reality. Such disorders affect a person’s mind which can alter the way they behave, communicate, make decisions, and  respond emotionally. When symptoms are severe, a person may believe events such as seeing, hearing or feeling things that are not there. Such symptoms can drastically alter one’s quality of life and limit a person’s ability to care for  themselves. If left untreated, psychotic conditions can cause people  to harm themselves or others. However, even the most extreme psychotic symptoms are treatable.

Depressive Disorders
Depression is one of the most common mood disorders and often co-occurs with other diagnoses such as drug and alcohol abuse, anxiety, or trauma. Although occasional ups and downs are part of normal life, if those feelings of sadness, emptiness, or lifelessness intensify or persist beyond a few weeks with no relief, you may have depression.

Recognizing depression is the first step toward healing. The following are signs that you need help for depression:

  • Changes in appetite and sleeping patterns
  • Feelings of worthlessness, hopelessness, or guilt
  • Lack of interest in your usual hobbies, work, or activities
  • Fatigue or inability to concentrate
  • Difficulty making a decision
  • Overwhelming sadness or suicidal thoughts or behaviors

Your treatment plan will be specifically designed by a staff of mental health experts, using cutting-edge depression treatment modalities to maximize your progress and get you back to enjoying life’s many pleasures.

Major Depression
Major depression, also known as clinical depression or unipolar depression, is classified as a type of affective disorder or mood disorder that goes beyond the day’s ordinary ups and downs, becoming a serious medical condition and important health concern in this country.

Bipolar Disorder / Manic Depression
Manic depression, also known as bipolar disorder, is classified as a type of affective disorder (also called mood disorder) that goes beyond the day’s ordinary ups and downs, and is a serious medical condition and important health concern in this country. Manic depression is characterized by periodic episodes of extreme elation, happiness, elevated mood, or irritability (also called mania) countered by periodic, classic major depressive symptoms.

Dysthymia
Dysthymia, also known as dysthymic disorder, is classified as a type of affective disorder (also called mood disorder) that often resembles a less severe, yet more chronic form of major (clinical) depression. However, persons with dysthymia may also experience major depressive episodes at times.

Anxiety Disorders
Anxiety is a reaction to stress that can take many forms, including panic disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and phobias. In its most debilitating state, anxiety sufferers experience the following symptoms:

  • Dread confronting everyday situations
  • Feeling afraid or panicked or unable to calm down
  • Feeling as though you’re having a nervous breakdown
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Rapid heartbeat

Phobias
A phobia is a persistent, intense and unreasonable fear of a specific object or situation. Phobias cause reactions and anxiety symptoms that result in an avoidance of objects or situations in which the phobia is triggered. As a result, the person’s daily functioning at work, in social situations and with families and friends can be severely disrupted.

Panic Disorder
Panic disorder is characterized by repeated, unexpected, sudden and intense fear or discomfort that is not based on a real threat. Often mistaken for serious physical problems, symptoms of a panic attack can include:

  • Heart palpitations and pounding or racing heart
  • Sweating
  • Trembling or shaking
  • Sensations of smothering or shortness of breath
  • Choking feeling
  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • Nausea or abdominal distress
  • Feeling dizzy, unsteady, lightheaded or faint
  • Fear of losing control or going crazy
  • Numbness or tingling sensations
  • Chills or hot flushes

People experiencing panic attacks often fear they are dying. When panic attacks begin to occur with some frequency, the person might begin to avoid situations in which an attack could be triggered. Such avoidant behaviors can severely restrict the person’s work and personal activities.

Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder
ADHD, also called attention-deficit disorder, is a behavior disorder, usually first diagnosed in childhood, that is characterized by inattention, impulsivity, and, in some cases, hyperactivity. These symptoms usually occur together; however, one may occur without the other(s).

Conduct Disorder
Conduct disorder is a behavior disorder, sometimes diagnosed in childhood, that is characterized by antisocial behaviors which violate the rights of others and age-appropriate social standards and rules. Antisocial behaviors may include irresponsibility, delinquent behaviors (such as truancy or running away), violating the rights of others (such as theft), and/or physical aggression toward others (such as assault or rape). These behaviors sometimes occur together; however, one or several may occur without the other(s).

Oppositional Defiant Disorder
Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is a behavior disorder, usually diagnosed in childhood, that is characterized by uncooperative, defiant, negativistic, irritable, and annoying behaviors toward parents, peers, teachers, and other authority figures.

Adjustment Disorders
An adjustment disorder is defined as an emotional or behavioral reaction to an identifiable stressful event or change in a person’s life that is considered maladaptive or somehow not an expected healthy response to the event or change. The reaction must occur within three months of the identified stressful event or change happening.

Suicidal Behavior
Suicidal behavior is defined as a preoccupation or act that is focused on causing one’s own death voluntarily. An intent to cause one’s death is essential in the definition. Suicidal ideation refers to thoughts of suicide or wanting to take one’s own life. Suicidal behavior refers to actions taken by one who is considering or preparing to cause his/her own death. Suicide attempt usually refers to an act focused on causing one’s own death that is unsuccessful in causing death. Suicide refers to having intentionally caused one’s own death.

Adjustment Disorders
An adjustment disorder is defined as an emotional or behavioral reaction to an identifiable stressful event or change in a person’s life that is considered maladaptive or somehow not an expected healthy response to the event or change. The reaction must occur within three months of the identified stressful event or change happening.

Tourette’s Disorder
Tourette’s disorder (TD), sometimes called Tourette’s syndrome (TS), is a neurological disorder characterized by multiple repeated tics. Tics are abrupt, purposeless, and involuntary vocal sounds or muscular jerks. Symptoms of TD usually begin between the ages of five and 10 years of age, and usually begin with mild, simple tics involving the face, head, or arms. With time, tics become more frequent and increase in variety, involving more body parts such as the trunk or legs, and often become more disruptive to activities of daily living (ADLs).

Autistic Disorder
Autistic disorder (also called autism; more recently described as “mindblindedness”) is a neurological and developmental disorder that usually appears during the first three years of life. A person with autism appears to live in his/her own world, showing little interest in others, and a lack of social awareness. The focus of an autistic person is a consistent routine and includes an interest in repeating odd and peculiar behaviors. Autistic people often have problems in communication, avoid eye contact, and show limited attachment to others.

Autism can prevent a person from forming relationships with others (in part, due to an inability to interpret facial expressions or emotions). Persons with autism tend to exhibit repeated body movements (such as flapping hands or rocking) and have unusual attachments to objects. However, many persons with autism excel consistently on certain mental tasks (i.e., counting, measuring, art, music, memory).

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